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Coronavirus has created less of a need for ‘cold hard cash’ as Americans move to contactless payments

FILE PHOTO: A packet  of former U.S. President Abraham Lincoln five-dollar bill currency is inspected at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File PhotoReuters

Since the coronavirus pandemic has discouraged any unnecessary contact, 54% of Americans surveyed have concerns about touching cash, with many Americans making the switch to contactless payment.
While “it will take years before the U.S. resembles Asia” with the availability of contactless payments, the pandemic has made it more commonplace. 
Consumers shouldn’t expect the U.S. to go entirely cashless anytime soon, as big cities have banned the practice of card-only businesses. 
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the coronavirus pandemic has discouraged any unnecessary contact, 54% of Americans surveyed have concerns about touching cash, according to findings from a survey conducted by digital payment group Raypd.

While it’s still unclear how much bills and coins spread coronavirus — if at all — consumers are still trying to avoid contact as much as possible, especially with objects that may come into contact with multiple people. See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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